Compendium of Phenomena

2.1 Arising of Mind

2.1.10. Without cause, without action, indeterminate

Action-thoughts (A) In connexion with the Sensuous Universe

(a) On occasion of Ideation

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When an element of ideation of the kind termed kiriya has arisen, which is neither good nor bad nor the result of karma, which is accompanied by disinterestedness, and which has as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, or what not, then there is

  • contact
  • thought,
  • feeling, conception,
  • perception, discursive thought,
  • thinking, disinterestedness,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of ideation,
  • disinterestedness,
  • vitality.

Now these, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Summary

Now, at that time

  • the skandhas are four,
  • the spheres are two,
  • the elements are two,
  • the nutriments are three,
  • the faculties are three,
  • contact,
  • etc.

The skandha of syntheses (as well as the remainder of the foregoing summary) is identical with the corresponding passages in Chapter 1, viz., §§467a, 468.

(b) On occasion of Representative Intellection

1.

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When an element of representative intellection of the kind termed kiriya has arisen, which is neither good nor bad nor the result of karma, which is accompanied by happiness, and which has as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, or what not, then there is

  • contact, conception,
  • feeling
  • discursive thought,
  • perception, joy,
  • thinking
  • ease,
  • thought
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of
  • energy, ideation,
  • concentration, happiness,
  • vitality.

Now these, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Question and answer on ‘contact’ as above passim.

What on that occasion is self-collectedness?

The stability, solidity, absorbed steadfastness of thought which on that occasion is the absence of distraction, balance, imperturbed mental procedure, quiet, the faculty and the power of concentration—this is the self-collectedness that there then is.

What on that occasion is the faculty of energy …

of concentration?

Answers as in §13 and §570 respectively.

Summary

Now at that time

  • the skandhas are four,
  • the spheres are two,
  • the elements are two,
  • the nutriments are three,
  • the faculties are five,
  • contact,
  • etc.

Continue as in §482a.

What on that occasion is the skandha of syntheses?

  • Contact,
  • thinking,
  • conception,
  • discursive thought,
  • joy,
  • self-collectedness,
  • the faculties of energy,
  • concentration,
  • vitality.

Or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion, exclusive of the skandhas of feeling, perception, and intellect—these are the skandha of syntheses.

2.

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When an element of representative intellection of the kind termed kiriya has arisen, which is neither good, nor bad, nor the result of karma, which is accompanied by disinterestedness, and which has as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, or what not, then there is

  • contact
  • thought,
  • feeling,
  • conception,
  • perception,
  • discursive thought,
  • thinking,
  • disinterestedness,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of
  • energy,
  • ideation,
  • concentration,
  • disinterestedness,
  • vitality.

Now these, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Summary

Identical with 572a.

The skandha of syntheses is identical with that in §573, but ‘joy’ must be omitted.

3.

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When an element of representative intellection of the kind termed kiriya has arisen that is neither good, nor bad, nor the result of karma —

  • which is accompanied by happiness and associated with knowledge …
  • which is accompanied by happiness, associated with knowledge, and prompted by a conscious motive …
  • which is accom panied by happiness and disconnected with knowledge …
  • which is accompanied by happiness, disconnected with knowledge and prompted by a conscious motive …
  • which is accompanied by disinterestedness and associ ated with knowledge …
  • which is accompanied by disinterestedness, associated with knowledge and prompted by a conscious motive …
  • which is accompanied by disinterestedness and disconnected with knowledge …
  • which is accompanied by disinterestedness, disconnected with knowledge and prompted by a conscious motive

— and, which has as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, or what not— then there is contact … balance. Now these … are states that are indeterminate.

  • That absence of lust which is the root of the indeterminate …
  • that absence of hate which is the root of the inde terminate …
  • that absence of dullness which is the root of the indeterminate …

these are states that are indeterminate.

(B) In connexion with the Universe of Form

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When he cultivates rapt meditation in connexion with the universe of Form, and of the kind termed kiriya which is neither good, nor bad, nor the result of karma, and which is concerned with easeful living under present conditions—and so, aloof from sensuous appetites, aloof from evil ideas, by earth-wholeness, enters into and abides in the First Jhāna … then there is contact … balance. Now these … are states that are indeterminate.

Repeat in the case of each remaining Jhāna on the Fourfold f and of those on the Fivefold System.

(C) In connexion with the Universe of the Formless

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When he cultivates rapt meditation in connexion with the universe of the Formless, of the kind termed kiriya, which is neither good, nor bad, nor the result of karma, and is concerned with easeful living under present conditions—and when, by passing wholly beyond all consciousness of form, by the dying out of the consciousness of sensory reaction, by turning the attention from any consciousness of the manifold, he enters into and abides in that rapt meditation which is accompanied by the consciousness of a sphere of unbounded space—even the Fourth Jhāna, to gain which all sense of ease must have been put away, etc… . then there is contact … balance. Now these … are states that are indeterminate.

Here follow, with the same opening formula as in the foregoing answer, the three remaining ‘Jhānas con nected with Formless Existence’. See §§266–268.

  • That absence of lust which is the root of the indeterminate …
  • that absence of hate which is the root of the indeterminate …
  • that absence of dullness which is the root of the indeterminate …

these … are states that are indeterminate.

Here ends the Fourfold System of Jhāna.