Compendium of Phenomena

2.1 Arising of Mind

2.1.7. Indeterminate result

1. In the sensuous universe.

(a) The Five Modes of Cognition considered as effects of good

(i.)

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, as the result of good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the sensuous universe, visual cognition has arisen, accompanied by disinterestedness, and having as its object something seen, then there is

  • contact
  • thinking,
  • feeling, thought,
  • perception, disinterestedness,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of:
  • ideation,
  • disinterestedness,
  • vitality.

These, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Question and answer on ‘contact’ as above, passim.

What on that occasion is feeling?

The mental [condition], neither pleasant nor unpleasant, which on that occasion is born of contact with the appropriate element of visual cognition; the sensation, born of contact with thought, which is neither easeful nor painful; the feeling, born of contact with thought, which is neither easeful nor painful—this is the feeling that there then is.

What on that occasion is perception?

The perception, the perceiving, the state of having perceived, which on that occasion is born of contact with the appropriate element of visual cognition—this is the perception that there then is.

What on that occasion is thinking?

The thinking, the cogitating, the reflection which on that occasion is born of contact with the appropriate element of visual cognition—this is the thinking that there then is.

What on that occasion is thought?

The thought which on that occasion is ideation, mind, heart, that which is clear, ideation as the sphere of mind, the faculty of ideation, intellect, the skandha of intellect, the appropriate element of visual cognition—this is the thought that there then is.

What on that occasion is disinterestedness?

Answer as for ‘feeling’, §436, omitting the phrase ‘which is born of contact with the appropriate element of visual cognition’.

What on that occasion is self-collectedness?

The persistence of thought which there is on that occasion—this is the self-collectedness that there then is. What on that occasion is the faculty of ideation?

Answer as for ‘thought’, §436.

What on that occasion is the faculty of disinterestedness?

Answer as in §437.

What on that occasion is the faculty of vitality?

Answer as in §19.

Or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are the states that are indeterminate.

Summary

Now, on that occasion

  • the skandhas are four,
  • the spheres are two,
  • the elements are two,
  • the nutriments are three,
  • the faculties are three,
  • contact counts as a single factor,
  • etc.

Continue as in §58,

  • the faculty of ideation counts as a single factor,
  • the element of visual cognition counts as a single factor,
  • the sphere of [mental] states counts as a single factor,
  • etc.

Continue as in §58.

What on that occasion is the skandha of syntheses?

  • Contact,
  • thinking,
  • self-collectedness,
  • the faculty of vitality,

or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion, exclusive of the skandhas of feeling, perception and intellect—these are the skandha of syntheses.

(ii.-v.)

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, as the result of good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the sensuous universe,

  • auditory cognition,
  • olfactory cognition, or
  • gustatory cognition

has arisen, accompanied by disinterestedness, and having as its object

  • a sound,
  • a smell, or
  • a taste

respectively … or

  • cognition of body

has arisen, accompanied by ease, and having as its object something tangible, then there is

  • contact
  • thinking,
  • feeling
  • thought,
  • perception, ease,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of ideation,
  • ease,
  • vitality.

Now, these, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Question and answer on ‘contact’ as above, passim,

What on that occasion is feeling?

The bodily pleasure, the bodily ease, which on that occasion is born of the appropriate element of the cognition of body; the pleasurable, easeful sensation which is born of contact with the body; the pleasurable, easeful feeling which is born of contact with the body—this is the feeling that there then is.

What on that occasion is perception?

The perception, the perceiving, the state of having perceived, which on that occasion is born of contact with appropriate element of the cognition of body—this is the perception that there then is.

What on that occasion is thinking?

The thinking, the cogitating, the reflection, which on that occasion is born of contact with the appropriate element of the cognition of body—this is the thinking that there then is.

What on that occasion is thought?

The thought which on that occasion is ideation, mind, heart, that which is clear; ideation as the sphere of mind, the faculty of ideation, intellect, the skandha of intellect, the appropriate element of the cognition of body—this is the thought that there then is.

What on that occasion is ease?

The bodily pleasure, the bodily ease which on that occasion is the pleasant, easeful sensation born of contact with the body; the pleasant, easeful feeling born of contact with the body—this is the ease that there then is.

What on that occasion is self-collectedness… the faculty of ideation … of ease … of vitality?

Answers as in §§438, 448, 449 and 441 respectively.

Or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Summary

Now, on that occasion

  • the skandhas are four,
  • etc.

Continue as in §441a, substituting ‘the element of the cognition of body’ for ‘the element of visual cognition’.

What on that occasion is the skandha of syntheses?

Answer as in §442.

(b) Good (karma) taking effect in ideation

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, as the result of good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the sensuous universe, an element of ideation has arisen, accompanied by disinterestedness, and having as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, or what not, then there is

  • contact
  • thought,
  • feeling
  • conception,
  • perception, discursive thought,
  • thinking, disinterestedness,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of
  • ideation,
  • disinterestedness,
  • vitality.

These, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

Question and answer on ‘contact’ as above, passim,

What on that occasion is feeling?

The mental [condition], neither pleasant nor unpleasant, which on that occasion is born of contact with the appropriate element of ideation; the sensation, born of contact with thought, which is neither easeful nor painful; the feeling, born of contact with thought, which is neither easeful nor painful—this is the feeling that there then is.

What on that occasion is perception … thinking … thought?

Answers as in §§446–448, substituting ‘element of ideation’ for ‘element of the cognition of body’.

What on that occasion is conception?

The ratiocination, the conceiving which on that occasion is the disposition, the fixation, the focussing, the application of the mind—this is the conception that there then is.

What on that occasion is discursive thought?

The process, the sustained procedure, the progress and access [of the mind] which on that occasion is the continuous adjusting and directing of thought—this is the discursive thought that there then is.

What on that occasion is disinterestedness … self-collectedness … the faculty of ideation … of disinterestedness … of vitality?

Answers as in §§437, 438, 460, 440, 441 respectively.

Summary

Now, on that occasion

  • the skandhas are four,
  • the spheres are two,
  • the elements are two,
  • the nutriments are three,
  • the faculties are three,
  • contact counts as a single factor,
  • etc.

Continue as in §58.

  • the faculty of ideation counts as a single factor,
  • the element of ideation counts as a single factor,
  • etc.

What on that occasion is the skandha of syntheses?

  • Contact,
  • discursive thought,
  • thinking
  • self-collectedness,
  • conception,
  • the faculty of vitality.

Or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion, exclusive of the skandhas of feeling, perception and intellect—these are the skandha of syntheses.

(c) Good (karma) taking effect in representative intellection

(i.) When accompanied by happiness,

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, as the result of good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the sensuous universe, an element of representative cognition has arisen, accompanied by happiness and having as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, the idea [of any of these], or what not, then there is

  • contact
  • conception,
  • feeling,
  • discursive thought,
  • perception,
  • joy,
  • thinking
  • ease,
  • thought,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of ideation,
  • happiness,
  • vitality.

These, or whatever other, etc.

Continue as in §455.

These thirteen constituent states are described as in §§2–11 and 17–19, with the exception of ‘conception’ (vitakko) and ‘self-collectedness’ (cittass’ ekaggata), which are described with the restricted connotation used in §§461, 464.

Summary

Identical with §467a, but ‘the element of representative cognition’ (manovinnanadhātu) must be substituted for ‘the element of ideation’.

What on that occasion is the skandha of syntheses?

  • Contact, discursive thought,
  • thinking, joy,
  • conception, self-collectedness;
  • the faculty of:
  • vitality.

Or whatever incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion, exclusive of the skandhas of feeling, perception and intellect—these are the skandha of syntheses.

(ii.) When accompanied by disinterestedness.

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, as the result of good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the sensuous universe, an element of representative cognition has arisen, accompanied by disinterestedness, and having as its object a sight, etc. (cf. above, §469] … then there is

  • contact
  • thought,
  • feeling,
  • conception,
  • perception,
  • discursive thought,
  • thinking,
  • disinterestedness,
  • self-collectedness;
  • the faculties of ideation,
  • disinterestedness,
  • vitality.

These, or whatever other, etc.

Continue as in §469.

These Thirteen states are described as in the foregoing section (i.), except that the questions and answers on ‘feeling’ and ‘disinterestedness’, as given in §§152–154, must he substituted for those on ‘feeling’, ‘joy’, and the ‘faculty of happiness’ given in §§471, 477, and 481. ‘Ease’ is omitted.

Summary

Terms identical with those in §482a.

The skandha of syntheses is identical with the content stated in §483, but with the omission of ‘joy’.

(d) The Eight Main Types of Kesults

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, as the result of good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the sensuous universe, an element of representative cognition has arisen,

  1. accompanied by happiness and associated with knowledge …
  2. accompanied by happiness, associated with knowledge, and prompted by a conscious motive …
  3. accompanied by happiness and disconnected with knowledge …
  4. accompanied by happiness, disconnected with knowledge, and prompted by a conscious motive …
  5. accompanied by disinterestedness and associated with knowledge …
  6. accompanied by disinterestedness, associated with knowledge, and prompted by a conscious motive …
  7. accompanied by disinterestedness and disconnected with knowledge …
  8. accompanied by disinterestedness, disconnectedwith knowledge, and prompted by a conscious motive, and having as its object a sight, a sound, a smell, a taste, something tangible, or what not, then there is contact … balance.

These, or whatever other incorporeal, causally induced states there are on that occasion—these are states that are indeterminate.

That absence of lust which is the root of indeterminateness … that absence of hate which is the root of indeterminateness … that absence of dullness which is the root of indeterminateness … these are states that are indeterminate.

2. In the universe of Form.

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, that he may attain to the heavens of Form, he cultivates the way thereto, and aloof from sensuous appetites, etc., enters into and abides in the First Jhāna … then there is contact, etc. Now, these … are states that are good. But when, as the result of just this good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the universe of Form, he, aloof from sensuous appetites, etc., enters into and abides in the First Jhāna … then there is contact, etc. And these … are states that are indeterminate.

Repeat, substituting the formula of the remaining Jhānas on the Fourfold System, and of all the Jhānas on the Fivefold System.

3. In the universe of the Formless.

Which are the states that are indeterminate?

When, that he may attain to the heavens of the Formless, he cultivates the way thereto, and so, by passing wholly beyond all consciousness of form, by the dying out of the consciousness of sensory reaction, by turning the attention from any consciousness of the manifold, he enters into and abides in that frame of mind which is accompanied by the consciousness of a sphere of unbounded space—even the Fourth Jhāna, to gain which all sense of ease must have been put away, etc. continue as in §265—then the contact … the balance that arises, these … are states that are good.

But when, as the result of just this good karma having been wrought, having been stored up in connexion with the universe of the Formless, he, by passing wholly beyond all consciousness of form, by the dying out of the consciousness of sensory reaction, by turning the attention from any consciousness of the manifold, enters into and abides in that rapt meditation which is accompanied by the consciousness of a sphere of unbounded space—even the Fourth Jhāna, to gain which all sense of ease must have been put away, etc. continue as above… then the contact … the balance that arises, these … are states that are indeterminate.

Here follow in succession the other three ‘Jhānas connected with Formless Existence’ (§§266–268), namely, ‘the Sphere of Infinite Intellection’, ‘the Sphere of Nothingness’, and ‘the Sphere where there is neither Perception nor Non-perception’, each having the Fourth Jhāna as its ‘result’, as in the formula stated in §501.