Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Nuns’ rules and their analysis

Nuns’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 53

… at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the nun Caṇḍakālī was one who made strife, who made quarrels, who made contention, who made brawls, who made disputes in the Order … see Bi-Ss.4 … The nun Thullanandā, saying: “These are ignorant, these are inexperienced, they do not even know a (formal) act or the defect of a (formal) act or the failure of a (formal) act or the success of a (formal) act,” and being quick tempered, she abused a group. Those who were modest nuns … spread it about, saying:

“How can the lady Thullanandā, being quick tempered, abuse a group?” …

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that the nun Thullanandā, being quick tempered, abused a group?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How, monks, can the nun Thullanandā … abuse a group? It is not, monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … this rule of training:

Whatever nun, being quick tempered, should abuse a group, there is an offence of expiation.”


Whatever means: … nun is to be understood in this case.

Being quick tempered means: she is called angry.

Group means: it is called an Order of nuns.

Should abuse means: if she abuses, saying: “These are ignorant, these are inexperienced, they do not even know a (formal) act … or the success of a (formal) act,” there is an offence of expiation. If she abuses several nuns or one nun or one who is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

There is no offence if she is aiming at (explaining) the goal … see Bi-Pc.52.2.3 … if she is the first wrong-doer.