Theravāda Collection on Monastic Law

Monks’ rules and their analysis

The chapter on relinquishment

Monks’ Relinquishment

13. The training rule on two parts

Origin story

At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Monastery. At that time, when monks from the group of six knew that the Master had prohibited getting blankets made entirely of black wool, they added just a little bit of white on the edge. In this way they got blankets made entirely of black wool. The monks of few desires … complained and criticized them, “How can those monks from the group of six act in this way?”

After criticizing those monks in many ways, they informed the Master. … “Is it true, monks, that you did this?”

“It’s true, Master.”

The Buddha rebuked them: “… Foolish men, how can you add just a little bit of white on the edge and in this way get blankets made entirely of black wool? This will not give rise to confidence in those without it … And, monks, this training rule should be recited thus:

Final ruling

‘If a monk is getting a new blanket made, he should use two parts of entirely black wool, a third part of white, and a fourth part of brown. If he gets a new blanket made without using two parts of entirely black wool, a third part of white, and a fourth part of brown, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession.’”

Definitions

New: newly made is what is meant.

A blanket: it is made by spreading out, not by weaving.

Getting made: making or getting made.

He should use two parts of entirely black wool: having weighed it, he should use two measures.

A third part of white: one measure of white.

A fourth part of brown: one measure of brown.

Without using two parts of entirely black wool, a third part of white, and a fourth part of brown: in the act of making it, or getting it made, without using two measures of entirely black wool, one measure of white, and one measure of brown, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. When he gets the blanket, it becomes subject to relinquishment.


The blanket should be relinquished to an Order, a group, or an individual. “And, monks, it should be relinquished in this way. … To be expanded as in Relinquishment 1, paragraphs 13–17, with appropriate substitutions. … ‘Venerables, this blanket which I got made without using two measures of entirely black wool, one measure of white, and one measure of brown, is to be relinquished. I relinquish it to the Order.’ … the Order should give … you should give … ‘I give this blanket back to you.’”

Permutations

If he finishes what he began himself, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession. If he gets others to finish what he began himself, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession. If he finishes himself what was begun by others, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession. If he gets others to finish what was begun by others, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession.

If he makes one, or gets one made, for someone else, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If he obtains one that was made by someone else and then uses it, he commits an offense of wrong conduct.

Non-offenses

There is no offense: if he makes one using one measure of white and one measure of brown; if he makes on using more than one measure of white and more than one measure of brown; if he makes one using just white and just brown; if he makes a canopy, a floor cover, a screen-wall, a mattress, or a pillow; if he is insane; if he is the first offender.


The third rule, the training rule on two parts, is finished.