Theravāda Collection on Monastic Law

Monks’ rules and their analysis

The chapter on relinquishment

Monks’ Relinquishment

30. The training rule on what is intended

Origin story

At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Monastery. At that time an association had prepared a meal together with robes for the Order, intending to offer the robes after giving the meal.

But monks from the group of six went to that association and said, “Sirs, give these robes to us.”

“Venerables, we can’t do that. We’ve prepared our annual alms-offering together with robes for the Order.”

“The Order has many donors and supporters. But since we’re staying here, we depend on you and look to you for support. If you don’t give to us, then who will? So give us these robes.” Being pressured by those monks from the group of six, that association gave the prepared robes to them and served the food to the Order.

The monks who knew that a meal together with robes had been prepared for the Order, but who did not know that the robes had been given to those monks from the group six, said, “You may offer the robes.”

“Venerables, there aren’t any. The robes we had prepared were diverted by the monks from the group of six to themselves.”

The monks of few desires … complained and criticized those monks, “How can those monks from the group of six divert to themselves things they know were intended for the Order?”

After criticizing those monks in many ways, they informed the Master. … “Is it true, monks, that you did this?”

“It’s true, Master.”

The Buddha rebuked them: “… Foolish men, how can you divert to yourselves things that you know were intended for the Order? This will not give rise to confidence in those without it … And, monks, this training rule should be recited thus:

Final ruling

‘If a monk diverts to himself something that he knows was intended for the Order, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession.’”

Definitions

A: whoever … Monk: … The monk who has been given the full ordination by a complete Order through a formal procedure consisting of one motion and three announcements that is unchallengeable and fit to stand— this sort of monk is meant in this case.

He knows: he knows by himself or others have informed him or the donor has informed him.

For the Order: given to the Order, given up to the Order.

Something: robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicines; even bath powder, a toothbrush, or a piece of string.

Intended: they have said, “We will give/we will prepare.”


In the act of diverting it to himself, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. When he gets it, it becomes subject to relinquishment.

It should be relinquished to an Order, a group, or an individual. “And, monks, it should be relinquished in this way. … To be expanded as in Relinquishment 1, paragraphs 13–17, with appropriate substitutions. … ‘Venerables, this thing which I diverted to myself knowing that it was intended for the Order is to be relinquished. I relinquish it to the Order.’ … the Order should give … you should give … ‘I give this back to you.’”

Permutations

If it is intended for the Order and he perceives it as such, and he diverts it to himself, he commits an offense entailing relinquishment and confession.

If it is intended for the Order, but he is unsure if it is, and he diverts it to himself, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it is intended for the Order, but he does not perceives it as such, and he diverts it to himself, there is no offense.

If it is intended for one Order and he diverts it to another Order or to a shrine, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it is intended for one shrine and he diverts it to another shrine or to an Order or to an individual, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it is intended for an individual and he diverts it to another individual or to an Order or to a shrine, he commits an offense of wrong conduct.

If it is not intended for the Order, but he perceives it as intended for the Order, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it is not intended for the Order, but he is unsure if it is, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it is not intended for the Order and he does not perceive it as such, there is no offense.

Non-offenses

There is no offense: if being asked, “Where may we give?” he says, “Give where your gift goes towards equipment/where it goes towards repairs/where it will last for a long time/where you feel inspired;” if he is insane; if he is the first offender.


The tenth rule, the training rule on what is intended, is finished.

The third chapter on bowls is finished.

This is the summary:

Two on bowls, and tonics,
Rainy season, the fifth on a gift;
Oneself, getting woven, haste,
Risky, and with the Order.


“Venerables, the thirty rules entailing relinquishment and confession have been recited. In regard to this I ask you, ‘Are you pure in this?’ A second time I ask, ‘Are you pure in this?’ A third time I ask, ‘Are you pure in this?’ You are pure in this and therefore silent. I will remember it thus.”

The chapter on offenses entailing relinquishment is finished.

The text on expulsion is finished.