The chapter on confession (pācittiya)

Monks’ Confession 14: the training rule on furniture

Origin story

First sub-story

At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Monastery. At that time it was winter, and the monks put furniture out in the open in order to warm themselves in the sun. But when the time for departure was announced, they left without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone. And the furniture was rained on.

The monks of few desires … complained and criticized them, “How can those monks put furniture out in the open and then leave without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone? The furniture was rained on.”

After criticizing those monks in many ways, they told the Master.… “Is it true, monks, that you did this?… And, monks, this training rule should be recited thus:

Final ruling

‘If a monk takes a bed, a bench, a mattress, or a stool belonging to the Order and puts it out in the open or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession.’”

In this way the Master laid down this training rule for the monks.

Second sub-story

Soon afterwards monks who had stayed out in the open brought the furniture back even though it was not the rainy season. The Master saw this, and after giving a teaching, he addressed the monks, “Monks, during the eight months outside of the rainy season, I allow you to store furniture under a roof-cover or at the foot of a tree or wherever crows or ravens donʼt leave droppings.”

Definitions

A: whoever … Monk: …The monk who has been given the full ordination by a complete Order through a procedure consisting of one motion and three announcements that is unchallengeable and fit to stand— this sort of monk is meant in this case.

Belonging to the Order: given to the Order, given up to the Order.

A bed: there are four kinds of beds: one with legs and frame called masāraka, one with legs and frame called bundikābaddha, one with crooked legs, one with detachable legs.

A bench: there are four kinds of benches: one with legs and frame called masāraka, one with legs and frame called bundikābaddha, one with crooked legs, one with detachable legs.

A mattress: there are five kinds of mattresses: a mattress stuffed with wool, a mattress stuffed with cloth, a mattress stuffed with bark, a mattress stuffed with grass, a mattress stuffed with leaves.

A stool: one made of bark, one made of reed; it is upholstered and then bound together.

Puts […] out: puts out oneself.

Gets […] put out: gets another to put out. If he gets one who is not fully ordained to put it out, it is the responsibility of the monk. If he gets one who is fully ordained to put it out, it is the responsibility of the one who puts it out.

Leaves without putting it away: he does not put it away himself.

Getting it put away: he does not get another to put it away.

Or telling anyone: if he does not tell a monk, a novice monk, or a monastery worker, then when he goes beyond the distance of a stone-throw of an average man, he commits an offense entailing confession.

Permutations

If it belongs to the Order, and he perceives it as belonging to the Order, and he puts it out in the open or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession. If it belongs to the Order, but he is unsure if it does … If it belongs to the Order, but he perceives it as belonging to an individual, and he puts it out in the open or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession.

If it is a mat underlay, a blanket, a floor cover, a straw mat, a leather covering, a foot-wiping cloth, or a bench made of wood, and he puts it out or gets it put out in the open, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense of wrong conduct.

If it belongs to an individual, but he perceives it as belonging to the Order, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to an individual, but he is unsure if it does, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to an individual, and he perceives it as belonging to an individual, but that individual is not himself, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to himself, there is no offense.

Non-offenses

There is no offense: if he leaves after putting it away; if he leaves after getting it put away; if he leaves after telling someone; if he leaves while he is sunning it; if he is obstructed; if there are dangers; if he is insane; if he is the first offender.


The fourth rule, the training rule on furniture, is finished.