The chapter on confession (pācittiya)

Monks’ Confession 15: the second training rule on furniture

Origin story

At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Monastery. At that time the monks from the group of seventeen were friends. The lived together, and when departing they departed together. On one occasion they put out bedding in a dwelling belonging to the Order, but then left without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone. And the bedding was eaten by termites.

The monks of few desires … complained and criticized them, “How can those monks from the group of seventeen put out bedding in a dwelling belonging to the Order, and then leave without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone? It gets eaten by termites.”

After criticizing those monks in many ways, they told the Master.… “Is it true, monks, that those monks are acting in that way?”

“It’s true, Master.”

The Buddha criticized them, “… How can those foolish men put out bedding in a dwelling belonging to the Order, and then leave without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone, and thereby the bedding gets eaten by termites? This will not give rise to confidence in those without it … And, monks, this training rule should be recited thus:

Final ruling

‘If a monk puts out bedding in a dwelling belonging to the Order, or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away, getting it put away, or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession.’”

Definitions

A: whoever … Monk: …The monk who has been given the full ordination by a complete Order through a procedure consisting of one motion and three announcements that is unchallengeable and fit to stand—this sort of monk is meant in this case.

A dwelling belonging to the Order: given to the Order, given up to the Order.

Bedding: a mattress, a mat underlay, a blanket, a floor cover, a straw mat, a leather covering, a sitting-mat, a bed sheet, a spread of grass, a spread of leaves.

Puts out: puts out oneself.

Gets […] put out: gets another to put out.

Leaves without putting it away: he does not put it away himself.

Getting it put away: he does not get another to put it away.

Or telling anyone: if he does not tell a monk, a novice monk, or a monastery worker, and he crosses the boundary of an enclosed monastery, he commits an offense entailing confession. If he goes beyond the vicinity of an unenclosed monastery, he commits an offense entailing confession.

Permutations

If it belongs to the Order, and he perceives it as belonging to the Order, and he puts out bedding there or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession. If it belongs to the Order, but he is unsure if it does, and he puts out bedding there or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession. If it belongs to the Order, but he perceives it as belonging to an individual, and he puts out bedding there or gets it put out, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense entailing confession.

If he puts out bedding, or gets it put out, in the vicinity of a dwelling, in the assembly-hall, under a roof-cover, or at the foot of a tree, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If he puts out a bed or a bench, or gets it put out, in a dwelling, in the vicinity of a dwelling, in the assembly-hall, under a roof-cover, or at the foot of a tree, and he then leaves without putting it away or getting it put away or telling anyone, he commits an offense of wrong conduct.

If it belongs to an individual, but he perceives it as belonging to the Order, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to an individual, but he is unsure if it does, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to an individual, and he perceives it as belonging to an individual, but that individual is not himself, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to himself, there is no offense.

Non-offenses

There is no offense: if he leaves after putting it away; if he leaves after getting it put away; if he leaves after telling someone; if the bedding is obstructed; if he abandons his intention to return, and at that spot tells someone; if he is obstructed; if there are dangers; if he is insane; if he is the first offender.


The fifth rule, the second training rule on furniture, is finished.