The chapter on confession (pācittiya)

Monks’ Confession 17: the training rule on throwing out

Origin story

At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Monastery. At that time the monks from the group of seventeen were repairing a large dwelling nearby, intending to stay there for the rainy season. The monks from the group of six saw this and said, “These monks from the group of seventeen are repairing a dwelling. Let’s throw them out.” But some of them said, “Let’s wait until they’ve finished repairing it.”

Soon afterwards the monks from the group of six said to those from the group of seventeen, “Leave, we get this dwelling.”

“Shouldn’t you have told us beforehand? We would’ve repaired another one.”

“Doesn’t this dwelling belong to the Order?”

“Yes it does.”

“Well then, leave; we get this dwelling.”

“The dwelling is large. You can stay here and so can we.”

But they said, “Leave, we get this dwelling,” and they grabbed them by the neck and threw them out in anger.

The monks from the group of seventeen cried. When other monks asked them why, they told them what had happened.

The monks of few desires … complained and criticized them, “How can the monks from the group of six angrily throw other monks out of a dwelling belonging to the Order?”

After criticizing those monks in many ways, they told the Master.… “Is it true, monks, that you did this?”

“It’s true, Master.”

The Buddha rebuked them, “… Foolish men, how can you angrily throw other monks out of a dwelling belonging to the Order? This will not give rise to confidence in those without it … And, monks, this training rule should be recited thus:

Final ruling

‘If a monk, in anger, throws another monk out of a dwelling belonging to the Order, or gets him thrown out, he commits an offense entailing confession.’”

Definitions

A: whoever … Monk: …The monk who has been given the full ordination by a complete Order through a procedure consisting of one motion and three announcements that is unchallengeable and fit to stand— this sort of monk is meant in this case.

Another monk: a different monk.

In anger: discontent, having hatred, hostile.

A dwelling belonging to the Order: given to the Order, given up to the Order.

Throws out: if he takes hold of him in a room and throws him into the entrance area, he commits an offense entailing confession. If he takes hold of him in the entrance area and throws him outside, he commits an offense entailing confession. Even if he makes him go through many doors with a single effort, he commits one offense entailing confession.

Gets […] thrown out: if he asks another, he commits an offense entailing confession. If he only asks once, then even if the other makes him go through many doors, he commits one offense entailing confession.

Permutations

If it belongs to the Order, and he perceives it as belonging to the Order, and in anger he throws him out or gets him thrown out, he commits an offense entailing confession. If it belongs to the Order, but he is unsure if it does, and in anger he throws him out or gets him thrown out, he commits an offense entailing confession. If it belongs to the Order, but he perceives it as belonging to an individual, and in anger he throws him out or gets him thrown out, he commits an offense entailing confession.

If he throws out one of his requisites, or he gets it thrown out, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If he throws him out or gets him thrown out from the vicinity of a dwelling, from an assembly-hall, from under a roof-cover, from the foot of a tree, or from a space out in the open, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If he throws out one of his requisites from any of these places, or he gets it thrown out, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If he throws out one who is not fully ordained, or gets them thrown out, from a dwelling, from the vicinity of a dwelling, from an assembly-hall, from under a roof-cover, from the foot of a tree, or from a space out in the open, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If he throws out one of his requisites from any of these places, or gets it thrown out, he commits an offense of wrong conduct.

If it belongs to an individual, but he perceives it as belonging to the Order, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to an individual, but he is unsure if it does, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to an individual, and he perceives it as belonging to an individual, but that individual is not himself, he commits an offense of wrong conduct. If it belongs to himself, there is no offense.

Non-offenses

There is no offense: if he throws out, or gets thrown out, one who is shameless; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, a requisite belonging to that person; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, one who is insane; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, a requisite belonging to that person; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, one who is quarrelsome and disputatious, who creates legal issues in the Order; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, a requisite belonging to that person; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, a pupil or student who is not acting appropriately; if he throws out, or gets thrown out, a requisite belonging to that person; if he is insane; if he is the first offender.


The seventh rule, the training rule on throwing out, is finished.