Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Monks’ rules and their analysis

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 54

… at Kosambī in Ghosita’s monastery. Now at that time the venerable Channa indulged in bad habits. The monks said:

“Reverend Channa, do not do that, it is not allowable.” He did the same (things) out of disrespect. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the venerable Channa do a disrespectful thing?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, Channa, did a disrespectful thing?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked him, saying:

“How can you, foolish man, do a disrespectful thing? It is not, foolish man, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

In disrespect there is an offence of expiation.”


Disrespect means: there are two (kinds of) disrespect: disrespect for a man and disrespect for dhamma. Disrespect for a man means: if being spoken to by one who is ordained concerning what is laid down, thinking, ‘This one is suspended or disparaged or blameworthy, his bidding will not come to be done,’ he does a disrespectful thing, there is an offence of expiation. Disrespect for dhamma means: if being spoken to by one who is ordained concerning what is laid down, (saying), ‘How may this be lost or destroyed or disappear? or, he does not wish to learn this,’ he does a disrespectful thing, there is an offence of expiation.


If he thinks that he is ordained when he is ordained (and) does a disrespectful thing, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether he is ordained … If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is ordained … offence of expiation. If being spoken to by one who is ordained concerning what is not laid down, thinking, ‘This does not conduce to expunging (evil) nor to punctiliousness nor to graciousness nor to decreasing (the obstructions) nor to putting forth energy,’ he does a disrespectful thing, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If being spoken to by one who is not ordained concerning what is laid down or concerning what is not laid down, thinking, ‘This does not conduce to expunging (evil) … nor to putting forth energy,’ he does a disrespectful thing, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


There is no offence if he speaks, saying: ‘Thus the version of our teachers is an interrogation’; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Fourth