Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Monks’ rules and their analysis

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 58

… at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time many monks and wanderers were going along the high-road from Sāketa to Sāvatthī. On the way, thieves, having issued forth, robbed them. At Sāvatthī hirelings of the king, having issued forth, having seized these thieves with the goods, sent a messenger to the monks, saying:

“Let the revered sirs come; let each, recognising his own robe, take it.”

The monks did not recognise them. They looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying:

“How can the revered sirs not recognise their own robes?”

Monks heard these people who … spread it about. Then these monks told this matter to the lord. Then the lord on this occasion, in this connection, having had the Order of monks convened, having given reasoned talk on what is befitting, on what is suitable, addressed the monks, saying:

“On account of this, monks, I will lay down a rule of training for monks based on ten grounds: for the excellence of the Order, for the comfort of the Order … for establishing what is verily dhamma, for following discipline. And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

When a monk obtains a new robe, any one mode of disfigurement of the three modes of disfigurement must be taken: either dark green or mud(-colour) or black. If a monk should make use of a new robe without taking any one mode of disfigurement of the three modes of disfigurement, there is an offence of expiation.”


New means: it is called so if not made allowable.

Robe means: any one robe of the six (kinds of) robes.

Any one mode of disfigurement of the three modes of disfigurement must be taken means: even (as little as) with a blade of grass must be taken.

Dark green means: there are two (kinds of) dark green: the dark green of bronze, the dark green of foliage.

Mud(-colour) means: it is called water.

Black means: anything that is of black.

If a monk … without taking any one mode of disfigurement of the three modes of disfigurement means: if a monk makes use of a new robe without having taken any one mode of disfigurement of the three modes of disfigurement, even (as little as) with a blade of grass, there is an offence of expiation.


If he makes use of it, thinking that he has not taken when he has not taken, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether he has not taken … If he makes use of it, thinking that he has taken when he has not taken, there is an offence of expiation. If he thinks that he has not taken when he has taken, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether he has taken, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he has taken when he has taken, there is no offence.


There is no offence if, having taken, he makes use of it; if what is allowable becomes destroyed; if what made the appearance allowable becomes worn away; if what was not made allowable becomes sewn together with what was made allowable; if there is a patch; if there is a braiding; if there is a binding ; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Eighth