Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Monks’ rules and their analysis

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 60

… at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of seventeen monks did not store their requisites. The group of six monks hid a bowl and a robe belonging to the group of seventeen monks. The group of seventeen monks spoke thus to the group of six monks:

“Your reverences, give back the bowl and the robe to us.”

The group of six monks laughed; these cried out. Monks spoke thus:

“Why do you, your reverences, cry out?”

“Your reverences, this group of six monks are hiding a bowl and a robe belonging to us.”

Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the group of six monks hide a bowl and a robe belonging to monks?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, are hiding a bowl and a robe belonging to monks?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, hide a bowl and a robe belonging to monks? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should hide or should cause to hide a monk’s bowl or robe or (piece of cloth) to sit upon or needle-case or girdle, even in fun, there is an offence of expiation.”


Whatever means: … is monk to be understood in this case.

A monk’s means: another monk’s.

Bowl means: there are two (kinds of) bowls, an iron bowl and a clay bowl.

Robe means: any one robe of the six (kinds of) robes, (including) the least one fit for assignment.

(Piece of cloth) to sit upon means: it is so called if it has a border.

Needle-case means: it is with a needle or it is without a needle.

Girdle means: there are two (kinds of) girdles, those made of strips of cloth and those …

Should hide means: if he himself hides, there is an offence of expiation.

Or should came to hide means: if he commands another, there is an offence of expiation. When once commanded, if he hides much, there is an offence of expiation.

Even in fun means: desiring amusement.


If he thinks that he is ordained when he is ordained, (and) hides or causes (someone) to hide a bowl … or a girdle, even in fun, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether he is ordained … If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is ordained … offence of expiation. If he hides or causes (someone) to hide another requisite, even in fun, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he hides or causes (someone) to hide the bowl or robe or another requisite of one who is not ordained, even in fun, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


There is no offence if he is not desiring fun; if he puts in order what is badly arranged; if he puts it in order, thinking, ‘I will give it back, having given dhamma-talk’; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Tenth

This is its key:

Fermented liquor, the finger, and water,
and disrespect, frightening,
Fire, bathing, disfigurement,
himself (the robe) not having been taken away,
and about hiding.

The Sixth Division: that on drinking fermented liquor