Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Monks’ rules and their analysis

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 76

… at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks defamed a monk with an unfounded charge of an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can the group of six monks defame … formal meeting of the Order?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, defamed a monk with an unfounded charge of an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order?” “It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying: “How can you, foolish men, defame … formal meeting of the Order? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should defame a monk with an unfounded charge of an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order, there is an offence of expiation.”


Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

Monk means: another monk.

Unfounded means: unseen, unheard, unsuspected.

Offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order means: any one of the thirteen (offences entailing this penalty).

Should defame means: if he reprimands him or causes (another) to reprimand him, there is an offence of expiation.


If he thinks that one is ordained when he is ordained, and defames (him) with an unfounded charge of an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether one is ordained… If he thinks that one is not ordained when he is ordained … offence of expiation. If he defames (him) in respect of a falling away from right habits or a falling away from right views, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he defames one who is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that one is ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether one is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that one is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


There is no offence if, thinking what is true, he reprimands him or causes (another) to reprimand him; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Sixth