Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Khandhaka (Cūḷavagga)

13. Accumulation (Samuccaya)

Emission of semen

At one time the Awakened One, the Lord, was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the venerable Udāyin came to have fallen into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, have fallen into one offence … not concealed. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Unconcealed mānatta

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin for the one offence … not concealed.

“And thus, monks, should it be inflicted: Monks, that monk Udāyin, having approached the Order, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having honoured the feet of the senior monks, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to it: ‘Honoured sirs, I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … not concealed. And a second time I ask the Order … not concealed. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … not concealed. And a third time I ask the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed.

“The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin fell into one offence … not concealed. He is asking the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence not concealed. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin fell into one offence … not concealed. He is asking the Order for mānatta (discipline) … not concealed. The Order is inflicting mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed. If the infliction of mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter: Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … should speak. Mānatta (discipline) is being inflicted by the Order for six nights on the monk Udāyin for the one offence: intentional emission of semen, not concealed. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Unconcealed rehabilitation

He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed; so I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed; thus the Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me on account of the one offence … not concealed. I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well, then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udāyin.

“And thus, monks, should he be rehabilitated: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having honoured the feet of the senior monks, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … not concealed; so I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed; thus the Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me on account of the one offence … not concealed. Now I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline), ask the Order for rehabilitation. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … So I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline), ask the Order a second time also for rehabilitation. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … So I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline), ask the Order a third time also for rehabilitation.

“The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin, fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed; so he asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed. The Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed. He, having performed mānatta (discipline), is asking the Order for rehabilitation. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may rehabilitate the monk Udāyin. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin fell into one offence … is asking the Order for rehabilitation. The Order is rehabilitating the monk Udāyin. If the rehabilitation of the monk Udāyin is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me … should speak. The monk Udāyin is rehabilitated by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Probation concealed for one night

Now at that time the venerable Udāyin came to have fallen into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, concealed for one day. He announced to monks, saying: “I, your reverences, have fallen into one offence … concealed for one day. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order impose probation for one day on the monk Udāyin on account of the offence … concealed for one day.

“And thus, monks, should it be imposed: … The matter which here follows is precisely as in Kd.13.1.2, Kd.13.1.3, with the necessary changes in the wording of (a) the offence, (b) the penalty

Mānatta concealed for one night

He, having stayed under probation, announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for one day; so I asked the Order for probation for one day on account of the one offence … concealed for one day; thus the Order imposed probation for one day on me on account of the one offence … concealed for one day. I have now stayed under probation. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … concealed for one day.

Here follows precisely the same material as in Kd.13.1.2, Kd.13.1.3, reading concealed for one day instead of not concealed …

Rehabilitation concealed for one night

He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to the monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … = Kd.13.4.1 … I, having stayed under probation, asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … concealed for one day. I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udāyin.

Here follows precisely the same material as in Kd.13.2.2, Kd.13.2.3, reading concealed for one day instead of not concealed …’”

Probation concealed for five days

Now at that time the venerable Udāyin fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, concealed for two days … three days … four days … five days. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for two … five days … = Kd.13.3 Instead of concealed for one day, probation for one day, read concealed for two … five days, probation for two … five days … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one on probation back to the beginning

While he was under probation he fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days; so I asked the Order for probation for five days on account of this offence … concealed for five days; thus the Order granted me probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days. Now while I was under probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation).

“And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … concealed for five days. So I asked the Order for probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days; thus the Order granted me probation for five days … concealed for five days. While I was doing probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I am asking the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of this offence … not concealed. And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for …

“The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … asked the Order for probation for five days … cf. Kd.13.2.3 … The Order granted probation for five days … While he was under probation he fell into one offence … not concealed. He is asking the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation). If it seems right to the Order, the Order may send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of … not concealed, while (he was under probation). This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … is asking the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation). The Order is sending the monk Udāyin back to the beginning … while (he was under probation). If the sending back to the beginning of the monk Udāyin … is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is sent back to the beginning by the Order. The sending back to the beginning for the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving mānatta back to the beginning

He, having stayed under probation, while he was deserving mānatta (discipline), fell into an offence … not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days; so I asked the Order … = Kd.13.7.1. Now while I was under probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed. The Order sent me back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (I was under probation). Now I, having stayed under probation while I was deserving mānatta (discipline), fell into one offence … not concealed. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well, then, monks, let the Order send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation).”

“And thus, monks, should he be sent back: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … concealed for five days … Having stayed under probation, while I was deserving mānatta (discipline), I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, having stayed under probation and while I was deserving mānatta (discipline).’ And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for …

“The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … asks for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while he was deserving mānatta (discipline), having stayed under probation. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning … having stayed under probation. This is the motion: Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin asks … The Order is sending the monk Udāyin back to the beginning … If the sending back to the beginning for the monk Udāyin on account of … is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is sent back to the beginning by the Order. The sending back to the beginning … is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Mānatta for three offences

He, having stayed under probation, announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days … as in Kd.13.4.2 … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of these offences.

as in Kd.13.4.2, Kd.13.4.3 … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’.”

Sending one undergoing mānatta back to the beginning

While he was undergoing mānatta (discipline) he fell into one offence … not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days … as in Kd.13.8.1 …” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence while he was undergoing mānatta (discipline), not concealed, inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … And thus, monks, should mānatta (discipline) for six nights be inflicted … Mānatta (discipline) for six nights is inflicted by the Order on the monk Udāyin for the one offence … It is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving rehabilitation back to the beginning

He, having performed mānatta (discipline) and while he deserved rehabilitation, fell into one offence … not concealed. He announced to monks … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … when he had performed mānatta (discipline) and while he deserved rehabilitation, inflict mānatta (discipline) on him for six nights. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … And thus, monks, should (discipline) for six nights be inflicted …‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Rehabilitation for one who has been sent back to the beginning

He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days. as in Kd.13.2.1. I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udāyin.

“And thus, monks, should he be rehabilitated: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … concealed for five days. So I asked the Order for probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days. Therefore the Order granted me probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days. While I was doing probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … while I was doing probation, not concealed. The Order sent me back to the beginning … But then I, having stayed under probation and while I deserved mānatta (discipline), fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning … The Order sent me back to the beginning … not concealed. So I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the three offences. Because of this, the Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me on account of the three offences. But wfrle I was under-going mānatta (discipline) I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning … Thus the Order sent me back to the beginning … So I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … while I was undergoing mānatta (discipline), not concealed. The Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me. When I had performed mānatta (discipline) and while I deserved rehabilitation, I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … while I deserved rehabilitation, not concealed. Thus the Order sent me back to the beginning … And I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … while I deserved rehabilitaion, not concealed. Because of this, the Order inflicted mānatta, (discipline) for six nights on me … So I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline) ask the Order for rehabilitation.’ And a second time should it be asked for … And a third time should it be asked for …

“The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: Honoured sirs, … as in Kd.13.12.2 … He, having performed mānatta (discipline), asks the Order for rehabilitation. If it seems right to the Order, … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is rehabilitated by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order … Thus do I understand this.’”

Probation for one who has concealed for a fortnight

Now at that time the venerable Udāyin fell into one offence … concealed for half a month … as in Kd.13.3 Instead of concealed for one day, probation for one day read concealed for half a month, probation for half a month … ‘…Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one on probation for a fortnight back to the beginning

While he was under probation he fell into one offence … concealed for five days. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for half a month. So I asked the Order for probation for half a month on account of the one offence … concealed for half a month. Because of this the Order granted me probation for half a month. Then while I was under probation, I fell into one offence … concealed for five days. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, grant him probation concurrent with the former offence.

“And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning: … as in Kd.13.7.2, Kd.13.7.3. Read concealed for half a month, probation for half a month,and then concealed for five days instead of concealed for five days, probation for five days, and then not concealed … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Concurrent probation

“And thus, monks, should probation concurrent with the former offence be granted: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, asked the Order for sending back to the beginning … = Kd.13.14.2 … Therefore the Order sent me back to the beginning on account of the one offence … while I was under probation for half a month, concealed for five days. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for concurrent probation with the former offence … while I was under probation for half a month, concealed for five days’. And a second time … And a third time it should be asked for. The Order should be informed … ‘… And a third time I speak forth this matter … Concurrent probation with the former offence is granted by the Order to the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … while he was under probation for half a month, concealed for five days. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving mānatta back to the beginning, etc.

He, having stayed under probation, while deserving mānatta (discipline), fell into one offence … concealed for five days … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, grant him probation concurrent with the former offence. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … as in Kd.13.14.2, Kd.13.14.3 … And thus, monks, should probation concurrent with the former offence be granted … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Mānatta for three offences

He, having stayed under probation, announced to monks: … as in Kd.13.4.1 reading concealed for five days instead of concealed for one day … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the three offences. And thus, monks, should it be inflicted: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … ‘… And a third time I speak forth this matter … Mānatta (discipline) is inflicted by the Order for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the three offences. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one undergoing mānatta back to the beginningdi

While he was undergoing mānatta (discipline) he fell into one offence, concealed for five days. He announced to monks: I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for half a month …’ and he told all that had happened from Kd.13.13 onwards … They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, having granted him probation concurrent with the former offence, inflict mānatta (discipline) on him for six nights. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … And thus, monks, should probation concurrent with the former offence be granted … And thus, monks, should mānatta (discipline) for six nights be inflicted … ‘Mānatta (discipline) for six nights is inflicted by the Order on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … while he was undergoing mānatta (discipline), concealed for five days. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving rehabilitation back to the beginningdi

He, having performed mānatta (discipline), while he deserved rehabilitation fell into one offence … concealed for five days. He announced to monks: ‘I, your reverences, fell into one offence, concealed for half a month … he repeats all that has happened from Kd.13.13 onwards … When I had performed mānatta (discipline) and while I deserved rehabilitation, I fell into one offence … concealed for five days. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, having granted him probation concurrent with the former offence, inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on him … as in Kd.13.17.’ … Thus do I understand this.’”

Rehabilitation for one who has concealed for a fortnight

He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for half a month … as from Kd.13.13 onwards I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct is to be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udayin. And thus, monks, should he be rehabilitated: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order, … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence, … concealed for half a month. So I … But I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta discipline, ask the Order for rehabilitation …’ And a second time … And a third time it should be asked for … The Order should be informed … ‘… And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is rehabilitated by the Order. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Concluded (are the proceedings connected with) Intentional Emission.

Probation

Concurrent probation with dependent duration

Now at that time a certain monk came to have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: one offence was concealed for one day, one offence was concealed for two days … three … four … five … six … seven … eight … nine days, one offence was concealed for ten days. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; one offence was concealed for one day … one offence was concealed for ten days. What line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order grant this monk concurrent probation, its duration depending on whichever was the offence among these offences that was concealed for ten days.

“And thus, monks, should it be granted: That monk, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, revered sirs, have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; ‘… one offence was concealed for ten days. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for concurrent probation, its duration depending on whichever was the offence among these offences that was concealed for ten days’. And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for … The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk So-and-so fell into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; one was concealed for … ten days. He is asking the Order for concurrent probation, its duration depending on whichever was the offence among these offences that was concealed for ten days. If it seems right to the Order, the Order should grant the monk So-and-so concurrent probation … for ten days. This is the motion … Concurrent probation is being granted by the Order to the monk So-and-so, its duration depending on whichever was the offence among these offences that was concealed for ten days. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

All lengths concealed with dependent duration

Now at that time a certain monk had fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; one offence was concealed for one day, two offences were concealed for two days, three offences were concealed for three days, four … for four days, five … for five days … six for six days … seven for seven days, eight … for eight days, nine … for nine days, ten offences were concealed for ten days. He announced to monks, saying: “I, your reverences, have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; one offence was concealed for one day … ten offences were concealed for ten days. Now, what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order grant this monk concurrent probation, its duration depending on whichever were the offences among these offences that were each concealed the longest. And thus, monks, should it be granted: That monk, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘ I, honoured sirs, have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; one offence was concealed for one day … ten offences were concealed for ten days. Therefore I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for concurrent probation, its duration depending on whichever were the offences among these offences that were each concealed the longest.’ And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for … The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘… And a third time I speak forth this matter … Concurrent probation is granted by the Order to this monk, its duration depending on whichever were the offences among these offences that were each concealed the longest. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Probation for two months

Now at that time a certain monk fell into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; they were concealed for two months. It occurred to him: “I have fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; they were concealed for two months. Suppose I were to ask the Order for probation for two months for one offence concealed for two months?” He asked the Order for probation for two months for one offence concealed for two months. The Order granted him probation for two months for one offence concealed for two months. While he was under probation a feeling of shame overcame him, and he thought: “I fell into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; they were concealed for two months. It occurred to me: I have fallen into two offences … Suppose I were to ask the Order for probation for two months for one offence concealed for two months? I asked the Order … The Order granted me probation for two months for one offence concealed for two months. While I was under probation a feeling of shame overcame me. Suppose I were also to ask the Order for probation for two months for that other offence concealed for two months?”

He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into two offences … ‘… Suppose I were also to ask the Order for probation for two months for that other offence concealed for two months?’ Now, what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said.

“Well then, monks, let the Order grant this monk probation for two months on account also of that other offence concealed for two months. And thus, monks, should it be granted: That monk, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, have fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order … = Kd.13.22.2 … Suppose I were also to ask the Order for probation for two months on account of that other offence concealed for two months? So I, honoured sirs, am also asking the Order for probation for two months on account of that other offence concealed for two months. And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for.

“The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk So-and-so has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. It occurred to him: … He is also asking the Order for probation for two months on account of that other offence concealed for two months. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may also grant the monk So-and-so probation for two months on account of that other offence concealed for two months. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk So-and-so … And a third time I speak forth this matter. Probation is also being granted the monk So-and-so by the Order for two months on account of this other offence concealed for two months. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’ Well then, monks, that monk should do probation for two months from that date.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months … as above … The Order also granted him probation for two months on account of that other offence concealed for two months. Well then, monks, that monk should do probation for two months from that date.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. He knows that one is an offence, he does not know that the other is an offence. He asks the Order for probation for two months on account of that offence, concealed for two months, which he knows to be an offence. The Order grants him probation for two months an account of that offence concealed for two months. While he is under probation, he finds that the other is also an offence. It occurs to him: ‘I have fallen into two offences … I knew that one was an offence, I did not know that the other was an offence. So I asked the Order for probation for two months on account of that offence which I knew to be an offence, concealed for two months. The Order granted me probation for two months on account of that offence, concealed for two months. But while I was under probation, I found that the other was also an offence. Suppose I were also to ask the Order for probation for two months on account of this other offence, concealed for two months?’ He asks the Order for probation … The Order grants him probation for two months on account of this other offence also, concealed for two months. Well then, monks, this monk should do probation for two months from that date.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. He remembers one offence, he does not remember the other offence. He asks the Order for probation for two months on account of that offence, concealed for two months, which he remembers … = Kd.13.23.2. Read remembers, remembered instead of finds, found … for two months from this date.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. He is in no doubt that one is an offence, he is doubtful whether the other is an offence. He asks the Order for probation for two months on account of that offence about which he is in no doubt … = Kd.13.23.2. Read is doubtful for does not know … for two months from this date.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. One offence is knowingly concealed, the other offence is unknowingly concealed. He asks the Order for probation for two months on account of those offences concealed for two months. The Order grants him probation for two months on account of those offences concealed for two months. While he is under probation, a certain monk arrives—one who has heard much, to whom the tradition had been handed down, expert in dhamma, expert in discipline, expert in the summaries, clever, experienced, wise, conscientious, scrupulous, desirous of training. He speaks thus: ‘What, your reverences, has this monk fallen into? Why is this monk doing probation?’ They speak thus: ‘This monk, your reverence, has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. One offence was knowingly concealed, the other offence was unknowingly concealed. He asked the Order for probation for two months on account of these offences concealed for two months. The Order granted him probation for two months on account of these offences, concealed tor two months. This monk your reverence, has fallen into these, this monk is under probation on account of these.’ He speaks thus: ‘The granting of probation, your reverences, for that offence which he knowingly concealed is legally valid; because it is legally valid it is effective; but the granting of probation, your reverences, for that offence which he unknowingly concealed is not legally valid; because it is not legally valid it is not effective. For this offence, your reverences, the monk deserves mānatta (discipline).’

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. One offence is concealed, he remembering it, the other offence is concealed, he not remembering it … One offence is concealed, he being not in doubt (about it), the other offence is concealed, he being in doubt (about it) … ‘… For this offence, your reverences, this monk deserves mānatta (discipline).’”


Now at that time a certain monk had fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. It occurred to him: “I have fallen into two offences … concealed for two months. Suppose that I were to ask the Order for probation for one month on account of the two offences, concealed for two months?” He asked the Order … The Order granted him probation for one month on account of the two offences, concealed for two months. As he was under probation shame overcame him, and he thought: “I have fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. It occurred to me: … I asked the Order for probation for one month … The Order granted me probation for one month on account of the two offences concealed for two months. As I was under probation shame overcame me. What now, if I should also ask the Order for probation for a further month on account of the two offences concealed for two months?”

He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, have fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months … It occurred to me: … What now if I should also ask the Order for probation for a further month on account of the two offences concealed for two months? Now, what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord.

He said: “Well then, monks, let the Order also grant this monk probation for a further month on account of these two offences concealed for two months. And thus, monks, should it be asked for: That monk, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, have fallen into two offences … What now if I should also ask the Order for probation for a further month on account of the two offences, concealed for two months? So I, honoured sirs, am also asking the Order for probation for a further month on account of the two offences concealed for two months. And a second time … And a third time it should be asked for. The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk So-and-so fell into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. It occurred to him: ‘… Suppose I were also to ask the Order for probation for a further month on account of the two offences, concealed for two months?’ He is asking … If it seems right to the Order, the Order … If the giving of probation to the monk So-and-so for a further month also on account of the two offences concealed for two months is pleasing to the venerable ones … And a third time I speak forth this matter … Probation is granted by the Order to the monk So-and-so for a further month also on account of the two offences, concealed for two months. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’ Monks, that monk should do probation for two months from the earlier date.

Procedure for one to be given probation for two months

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. It occurs to him: ‘I have fallen into two offences … concealed for two months. Suppose I were to ask the Order for probation for one month on account of the two offences concealed for two months?’ … = Kd.13.25.1 … The Order also grants him probation for a further month on account of the two offences, concealed for two months. Monks, that monk should do probation for two months from the earlier date.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. He knows the one month, he does not know the other month … he remembers the one month, he does not remember the other month … he is not doubtful about the one month, he is doubtful about the other month. He asks the Order for probation for that month on account of the two offences, concealed for two months, about which he is not doubtful. The Order grants him probation … not doubtful. As he is doing probation he comes to be doubtful about the further month also. It occurs to him: ‘I have fallen into two offences … concealed for two months. I was not doubtful about the one month, I was doubtful about the other month … Suppose I were to ask the Order for probation for a further month also on account of the two offences concealed for two months?’ He asks the Order … The Order grants him probation for a further month also on account of the two offences, concealed for two months. Monks, that monk should do probation for two months from the earlier date.

This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. One month is knowingly concealed, the other month is unknowingly concealed … One month is concealed, he remembering it, the other month is concealed, he not remembering it … One month is concealed, he being not in doubt (about it), the other month is concealed, he being in doubt about it. He asks the Order for probation for two months on account of the two offences concealed for two months. The Order grants him probation for two months … concealed for two months. As he is under probation, another monk arrives—one who has heard much … desirous of training. He speaks thus: ‘Into what, your reverences, has this monk fallen? Why is this monk under probation?’ They speak thus: ‘This monk, your reverence, has fallen into two offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, concealed for two months. He concealed one month (although) he was not doubtful (about it), he concealed the other month (because) he was doubtful (about it). He asked the Order for probation … The Order granted him probation for two months on account of the two offences, concealed for two months. This monk, your reverence, has fallen into these, this monk is doing probation on account of these.’ He speaks thus: ‘The granting of probation, your reverences, for that month which he concealed (although) he was not doubtful (about it) is legally valid; because it is legally valid, it is effective; but the granting of probation, your reverences, for that month which he concealed because he was doubtful (about it) is not legally valid; because it is not legally valid, it is not effective. For that month, your reverences, that monk deserves mānatta discipline.’”

Purifying probation

Now at that time a certain monk came to have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order; he did not know about the expiration of the offences, he did not know about the expiration of the nights … He did not remember … He was doubtful about the expiration of the offences, he was doubtful about the expiration of the nights. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. I do not know about the expiration of the offences, I do not know about the expiration of the nights … I am doubtful about the expiration of the nights. Now, what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order grant the purifying probation to this monk on account of those offences.

And thus, monks, should it be granted: That monk, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. I do not know about the expiration of the offences … I am doubtful about the expiration of the nights. So I, honoured sirs, am asking the Order for the purifying probation on account of these offences’. And a second time … And a third time it should be asked for. The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk So-and-so has fallen into several offences … he is doubtful about the expiration of the nights. He is asking the Order for the purifying probation on account of those offences. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may grant the monk So-and-so the purifying probation on account of those offences. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk So-and-so … The Order is granting the monk So-and-so the purifying probation on account of those offences. If the granting to the monk So-and-so of the purifying probation on account of those offences is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak: And a second time … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The purifying probation is granted by the Order to the monk So-and-so on account of those offences. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’

“Thus, monks, should the purifying probation be granted, thus should probation be granted. And how, monks, should the purifying probation be granted? If he does not know about the expiration of the offences, if he does not know about the expiration of the nights, if he does not remember about the expiration of the offences, if he does not remember about the expiration of the nights, if he is doubtful about the expiration of the offences, if he is doubtful about the expiration of the nights, the purifying probation may be granted.

“If he knows about the expiration of the offences, if he does not know about the expiration of the nights, if he remembers about the expiration of the offences, if he does not remember about the expiration of nights, if he is not in doubt as to the expiration of the offences, if he is in doubt as to the expiration of the nights, the purifying probation may be granted.

“If he knows the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he does not know it in others, if he does not know the expiration of the nights, if he remembers the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he does not remember it in others, if he does not remember the expiration of the nights, if he is in doubt as to the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he is in no doubt as to it in others, if he is in doubt as to the expiration of the nights, the purifying probation may be granted.

“If he does not know the expiration of the offences, if he knows the expiration of the nights in some cases, if he does not know it in others, if he does not remember the expiration of the offences, if he remembers the expiration of the nights in some cases, if he does not remember it in others, if he is in doubt as to the expiration of the offences, if in some cases he is in doubt as to the expiration of the nights, if he is not in doubt in others, the purifying probation may be granted.

“If he knows the expiration of the offences, if he knows the expiration of the nights in some cases, if he does not know it in others, if he remembers the expiration of the offences, if he remembers the expiration of the nights in some cases, if he does not remember it in others, if he is not in doubt as to the expiration of the offences, if he is in doubt in some cases as to the expiration of the nights, if he is not in doubt in others, the purifying probation may be granted.

“If he knows the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he does not know it in others, if he knows the expiration of the nights in some cases, if he does not know it in others, if he remembers the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he does not remember it in others, if he remembers the expiration of the nights in some cases, if he does not remember it in others, if he is in doubt as to some offences, if he is not in doubt as to others, if he is in doubt as to some nights, if he is not in doubt as to others, the purifying probation may be granted.

“And how, monks may probation be granted? If he knows the expiration of the offences, if he knows the expiration of the nights, if he remembers the expiration of the offences, if he remembers the expiration of the nights, if he is not in doubt as to the expiration of the offences, if he is not in doubt as to the expiration of the nights, probation may be granted.

“If he does not know the expiration of the offences, if he knows the expiration of the nights, if he does not remember the expiration of the offences, if he remembers the expiration of the nights, if he is in doubt as to the expiration of the offences, if he is not in doubt as to the expiration of the nights, probation may be granted.

“If he knows the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he does not know it in others, if he knows the expiration of the nights, if he remembers the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he does not remember it in others, if he remembers the expiration of the nights, if he is in doubt as to the expiration of the offences in some cases, if he is not in doubt in others, if he is not in doubt as to the expiration of the nights, probation may be granted. Thus, monks, may probation be granted.”

Told is Probation.

Forty cases

“Now at that time a certain monk, while doing probation, left the Order. Having come back again, he asked the monks for ordination. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “This is a case, monks, where a monk, doing probation, leaves the Order. Monks, the probation of one who leaves the Order is not effective. If he is ordained again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, he must do probation (for any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, becomes a novice. Monks, the probation of a novice is not effective. If he is ordained again … as in preceding paragraph … remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, becomes mad. Monks, the probation of one who is mad is not effective. If he becomes sane again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, he must do probation (for any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, becomes unhinged in mind. Monks, the probation of one who is unhinged in mind is not effective. If he becomes not unhinged in mind again … This is a case, monks, where a monk, doing probation, becomes afflicted by pain. Monks, the probation of one afflicted by pain is not effective. If he becomes not afflicted by pain again … he must do probation for (any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, is suspended for not seeing an offence … for not making amends for an offence … for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the probation of one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, he must do probation for (any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves to be sent back to the beginning leaves the Order. Monks, the sending back to the beginning is not effective for one who leaves the Order. If he is ordained again, the earlier granting of the probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, that monk must be sent back to the beginning.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves to be sent back to the beginning becomes a novice … becomes mad … as in Kd.13.27.1 … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the sending back to the beginning of one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of the probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, that monk must be sent back to the beginning.

This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves mānatta (discipline) leaves the Order. Monks, the imposing of mānatta (discipline) on one who leaves the Order is not effective. If he is ordained again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly-granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves mānatta (discipline) becomes a novice … becomes mad … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the imposing of mānatta (discipline) on one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who is undergoing mānatta (discipline) leaves the Order … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the undergoing of mānatta (discipline) for one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, whatever mānatta (discipline) is imposed is properly imposed, whatever mānatta (discipline) is undergone is undergone thoroughly, it must be undergone for (any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves rehabilitation leaves the Order … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, rehabilitation of one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, whatever mānatta (discipline) is imposed is properly imposed, whatever mānatta (discipline) is undergone is undergone thoroughly, that monk may be rehabilitated.

Concluded are the Forty Cases.

Thirty-six cases

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, those not concealed not being many. That monk should be sent back to the beginning. This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, those concealed not being many. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation should be granted him on account of the earliest offence of the offences thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, those concealed as well as those not concealed not being many. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation should be granted him on account of the earliest offence of the offences thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, those not concealed being many … those concealed being many … those concealed as well as those not concealed being many … those not concealed not being many as well as being many … those concealed not being many as well as being many … those concealed as well as those not concealed not being many as well as being many. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation should be granted him on account of the earliest offence of the offences thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves mānatta (discipline) … who is undergoing mānatta (discipline) … who deserves rehabilitation meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, those not concealed not being many … those concealed as well as those not concealed not being many and being many. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation should be granted him on account of the earliest offence of the offences thus concealed.

Concluded are the Thirty-six Cases.

One hundred on mānatta

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, leaves the Order not having concealed them. He, being ordained again, does not conceal those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed upon that monk.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, leaves the Order not having concealed them. He, on being ordained again, conceals those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen … leaves the Order having concealed them. He, on being ordained again, does not conceal those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen … leaves the Order, having concealed them. He, on being ordained again, conceals those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. His offences are both concealed and not concealed. He, having left the Order, on being ordained again, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he concealed, afterwards he conceals those offences which formerly he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he concealed, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he concealed, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He knows some to be offences, he does not know others to be offences. The offences which he knows to be offences he conceals, those offences which he does not know to be offences he does not conceal. He, having left the Order, on being ordained again, conceals those offences which earlier he had known, does not conceal those offences which later he had known, does not conceal those offences which earlier he had not known, does not conceal those offences which later he had known. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, does not conceal those offences, (although) knowing them, which formerly, knowing them he concealed, afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, not knowing them, he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, knowing them he concealed, afterwards does not conceal those offences, knowing them, which formerly he did not conceal, not knowing them. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on this monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, knowing them, he concealed; afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, not knowing them, he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He remembers some to be offences … = Kd.13.29.3. Instead of he knows, knowing, not knowing, read he remembers, remembering, not remembering … thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He is in no doubt as to some of the offences, he is in doubt as to others of the offences … thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, becomes a novice … becomes mad … becomes unhinged in mind … this should be explained in detail as below. He comes to be in pain. His offences are concealed as well as unconcealed. He knows that some are offences, he does not know that others are offences. He remembers that some are offences, he does not remember that others are offences. He is in no doubt that some are offences, he is in doubt as to whether others are offences. He conceals those offences about which he is in no doubt, he does not conceal those offences about which he is in doubt. He comes to be in pain. Having come to be again not in pain, those offences which formerly he concealed because he was in no doubt, he afterwards does not conceal although he is in no doubt; those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards does not conceal although he is in doubt, those offences which formerly he concealed, being in no doubt, he afterwards does not conceal, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards conceals, not being in doubt, those offences which formerly he concealed, being in no doubt, he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards does not conceal, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he concealed, being in no doubt, he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on this monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier as well as later concealed.”

The Hundred on Mānatta.

Four hundred on concurrent probation and beginning

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, leaves the Order not having concealed them. On being ordained again, he does not conceal these offences. That monk should be sent back to the beginning.

“This is a case, monks … not having concealed them. On being ordained again, he conceals these offences. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation should be granted him on account on the earlier offences among the offences thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks … having concealed them. On being ordained again, he does not conceal these offences. That monk should be sent back to the beginning … thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … having concealed them. On being ordained again, he conceals these offences. That monk should be sent back to the beginning … thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. His offences are both concealed and not concealed. Having left the Order, he, on being ordained again, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he concealed, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he did not conceal. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation should be granted him on account of the earlier offences of the offences thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks … His offences are both concealed and not concealed. Having left the Order, he, on being ordained again, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly be concealed, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he did not conceal. That monk should be sent back to the beginning … thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he concealed, afterwards does not conceal those offences which formerly he did not conceal. That monk should be sent back to the beginning … thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he concealed, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he did not conceal. That monk should be sent back to the beginning … thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He knows some are offences, he does not know that others are offences … = Kd.13.29.3, Kd.13.29.4, Kd.13.30. The penalty is always the same: that monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation granted him on account of the earlier offences of the offences thus concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk deserving mānatta (discipline) … undergoing mānatta (discipline) … deserving rehabilitation, having meantime fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, leaves the Order, not having concealed them … The one deserving mānatta (discipline) and the one undergoing mānatta (discipline) and the one deserving rehabilitation should be explained in detail similarly to the one doing probation.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk deserving rehabilitation, having meantime fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, and not having concealed them, becomes a novice … becomes mad … becomes unhinged in mind …becomes afflicted by pain. His offences are both concealed and not concealed … = Kd.13.30 … he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt. That monk should be sent back to the beginning and concurrent probation granted him on account of the earlier offences of the offences thus concealed.

The portion with eighteen cases measured, etc.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not having concealed not many, not having concealed many, not having concealed one kind, not having concealed different kinds, not having concealed those of a like division, not having concealed those of the other division, not having concealed separate ones, not having concealed connected ones, leaves the Order.

The portion with eleven cases on two monks

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. They come to be of the opinion that the offence is one entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it, the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing, and having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. They are doubtful whether the offence is one entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it … as above … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. In regard to this offence they are of the opinion that it is a mixed offence. One conceals it … as above … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a mixed offence. In regard to this mixed offence they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a mixed offence. In regard to that mixed offence they are of the opinion that it is a mixed offence. One conceals it … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a slighter offence. In regard to this slighter offence they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it, the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing and both should be dealt with according to the rule.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a slighter offence. In regard to this slighter offence they are of the opinion that it is a slighter offence. One conceals it … according to the rule.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. In regard to this offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. It occurs to one, ‘I will tell about it,’ it occurs to the other, ‘I will not tell about it’. He conceals it during the first watch and he conceals it during the second watch and he conceals it during the third watch. If the offence is (still) concealed after the sun has risen, whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing, and having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. In regard to this offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. They go away, thinking, ‘We will tell about it.’ On the way, backsliding arises in one and he thinks, ‘I will not tell about it.’ He conceals it during the first watch and … he conceals it during the third watch. If the offence is (still) concealed after the sun has risen, … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks … They become mad, and later they, having become sane again, one conceals it the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing and, having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. As the Pātimokkha is being recited, these speak thus: ‘Only now do we understand that the rule, as is said, is handed down in a clause, contained in a clause (and) comes up for recitation every half-month.’ In regard to that offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it, the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing, and having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

Nine cases on impure beginning

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: many and not many and of one kind and of different kinds and of a like division and of a different division and separate and connected. He asks the Order for concurrent probation on account of these offences. The Order grants him concurrent probation on account of these offences. While he is doing probation he falls into several intervening offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, many, not concealed. On account of the intervening offences, he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of the intervening offences the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand, (but) it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many and of one kind and of different kinds and of a like division and of a different division and separate ones and connected ones. He asks the Order for concurrent probation on account of these offences. The Order grants him concurrent probation on account of these offences. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many, concealed … On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many … and connected ones. He asks the Order … While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: many, not concealed … many, concealed … many, concealed and not concealed I … not many and many, not concealed. On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk … and connected ones. He asks the Order for concurrent probation on account of these offences. The Order grants him concurrent probation on account of these offences. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many and concealed. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants him concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, … and connected ones. On account of these offences, he asks the Order for concurrent probation. On account of these offences, the Order grants him concurrent probation. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many and concealed and not concealed. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

Told are the Nine Cases where (a Monk on being sent back to) the Beginning is Not Pure.

Second set of nine cases

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many … and separate ones and connected ones. On account of these offences he asks the Order for concurrent probation. On account of these offences, the Order grants him concurrent probation. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many, not concealed. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is not legally valid, reversible, not fit to stand, it imposes mānatta (discipline) by rule, it rehabilitates him by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, … While he is under probation he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and concealed and not concealed … not many, concealed … On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is not legally valid, reversible, not fit to stand, it grants concurrent probation not by rule, imposes mānatta (discipline) by rule, it rehabilitates him by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, … While he is under probation he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many, concealed. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is not legally valid, reversible, not fit to stand. It grants him concurrent probation not by rule. He, thinking: ‘I am under probation’, meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many, concealed. He, arrived at that stage, remembers among the earlier offences offences (fallen into) meantime, he remembers among the subsequent offence’s offences (fallen into) meantime. It occurs to him, ‘Now, I have fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many and many … and separate ones and connected ones. On account of these offences I asked the Order for concurrent probation. On account of these offences the Order granted me concurrent probation. While I was under probation, I meantime fell into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many, concealed. So on account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sent me back to the beginning by a (formal) act that was not legally valid, reversible, not fit to stand. It granted concurrent probation not by rule. Then I, thinking ‘I am under probation,’ meantime fell into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many, concealed. Then I, arrived at this stage, remembered among the earlier offences offences fallen into meantime, I remembered among the subsequent offences offences fallen into meantime. Suppose that I, on account of those offences among the earlier offences, and on account of those offences among the subsequent offences, should ask the Order for sending back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand, for concurrent probation by rule, for mānatta ( (discipline) by rule, for rehabilitation by rule?’ He asks the Order … The Order, on account of those offences among the earlier offences and on account of those offences among the subsequent offences, sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand, it grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) by rule, it rehabilitates him by rule. Monks, that monk is pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, … This case is identical with the preceding, but instead of concealed read concealed and not concealed

“This is a case, monks … While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, many, not concealed, many, concealed … not many and many, not concealed. On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is not legally valid, reversible, not fit to stand. It imposes mānatta (discipline) by rule, rehabilitates by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

Third set of nine cases

“This is a case, monks, … While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many and many, and concealed … not many and many and concealed and not concealed … On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is not legally valid, reversible, not fit to stand, it grants him concurrent probation not by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) by rule, it rehabilitates him by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks … The two cases given here are identical with those specified in Kd.13.36.2; instead of not many read many … Monks, that monk is pure in regard to those offences.”

Told is the Third Section: that on Accumulation (of Offences).

This is its key:

Not concealed, and one day, two days, three days, four days and five days,
and for a fortnight, ten days: the Great Sage speaks of an offence, /
And slighter ones, leaving the Order, about ‘not many’, two monks there agree,
two are doubtful, are of the opinion that it is a mixed offence, /
They are of the opinion that it is a heavier offence when it is a slighter one,
likewise of the opinion that it is a slighter one. /
One conceals, and then about backsliding,and confessing for one who was mad, (sending back) to the beginning, he is pure. /
The recitation is for the maintenance of true dhamma
among the teachers of the Vibhajja doctrines,
and who, dwellers in the Mahāvihāra, illuminate Tambapaṇṇidīpa.