Theravāda Vinayapiṭaka

Parivāra

12. An Additional Collection Of Stanzas

“For what purpose is reproving,
by reason of what is there making remember,
For what purpose is the Order,
but by reason of what is there an act of Understanding?”

“Reproving is for making remember,
for restraint is making remember,
The Order is for discerning,
but an act of understanding is individual.

“Do not speak quickly,
do not speak angrily,
Do not arouse resentment
if you would be an adjudicator.

“Do not in haste speak challenging talk
unconnected with the meaning
In Sutta, in Discipline, in Parivāra,
in what is laid down, in the principal authorities.

“Be careful of the proper procedure
that was done with skill by him of discernment,
Of what was well spoken
in conformity with the rules of training,
not destroying a bourn in a future state.

“Seeking for welfare, be intent during (that) time
on what is connected with the goal.
Consider not in haste the mode of speech
of the reproved or the reprover.

“If the reprover says he has fallen,
if he who is being reproved says he has not fallen—
Both, proceeding, should be dealt with
according to (their) acknowledgement.

“Acknowledgement is carried out among the conscientious,
it exists not among the unconscientious;
Though many unconscientious (monks) may say,
‘It should be carried out according to what has been said’.”

“Of what kind is an unconscientious one
for whom acknowledgement is not Effective?
Thus I ask you this:
What is the kind called an unconscientious individual?”

“He falls into an offence intentionally,
he hides the offence,
And goes following a wrong course:
this is the kind called an unconscientious individual.”

“‘I too know the truth’—
this is the kind called unconscientious individual.
And I am asking you another:
what is the kind called a conscientious individual?”

“He does not fall into an offence intentionally,
he does not hide an offence,
He does not go following a wrong course:
this is the kind called a conscientious individual.”

“‘I too know the truth’—
this is the kind called a conscientious individual.
And I am asking you another:
what is the kind called one who reproves
according to what is not the rule?”

“He reproves at a wrong time,
about what is not fact, with harshness,
and with what is unconnected with the goal;
He reproves with inner hatred,
not with a mind of loving-kindness:
this is the kind called one who reproves
according to what is not the rule.”

“‘I too know the truth’—
this is the kind called one who reproves
according to what is not the rule.
And I am asking you another:
what is the kind called one who reproves
according to the rule?”

“He reproves at a right time,
about fact, with gentleness,
with what is connected with the goal,
He reproves with a mind of loving-kindness,
not with inner hatred:
this is the kind called one who reproves
according to the rule.”

“‘I too know the truth’—
this is the kind called one who reproves
according to the rule.
And I am asking you another:
what is the kind called one who reproves Ignorantly?”

“He does not know the earlier and the later,
he is unskilled in the earlier and the later,
He does not know the sequence of the connecting words,
he is unskilled in the sequence of the connecting words:
this is the kind called one who reproves ignorantly.”

“‘I too know the truth’—
this is the kind called one who reproves ignorantly.
And I am asking you another:
what is the kind called one who reproves wisely?”

“He knows the earlier and the later,
he is skilled in the earlier and the later,
He knows the sequence of the connecting words,
is skilled in the sequence of the connecting words:
this is kind called one who reproves wisely.”

“‘I too know the truth’—
this is the kind called one who reproves wisely.
And I am asking you another:
what is reproving called?”

“He reproves for falling away from moral habit,
then from right behaviour and view,
And he reproves for a (wrong) mode of livelihood:
therefore it is called reproving.”

Concluded is an Additional Collection of Stanzas