Saṃyuktāgama

59. Discourse on Arising and Ceasing

Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park.

At that time the Blessed One said to the monks: “There are five aggregates of clinging. What are the five? They are the bodily form aggregate of clinging … the feeling … the perception … the formations … the consciousness aggregate of clinging.

Monks, contemplate these five aggregates of clinging, their nature to arise and cease, that is: ‘This is bodily form, this is the arising of bodily form, this is the cessation of bodily form; this is feeling … perception … formations … consciousness, this is the arising of consciousness, this is the cessation of consciousness.’

“What is the arising of bodily form? What is the cessation of bodily form? What is the arising of feeling … perception … formations … consciousness? What is the cessation of feeling … perception … formations … consciousness?

“With the arising of craving and delight, bodily form arises; with the cessation of craving and delight, bodily form ceases. With the arising of contact, feeling … perception … formations arise; with the cessation of contact, feeling … perception … formations cease. With the arising of name-and-form, consciousness arises; with the cessation of name-and-form, consciousness ceases.

“Monks, in this way bodily form arises and bodily form ceases, this is the arising of bodily form and the cessation of bodily form. In this way feeling … perception … formations … consciousness arises and feeling … perception … formations … consciousness ceases, this is the arising of feeling … perception … formations … consciousness and the cessation of feeling … perception … formations … consciousness.”

When the Buddha had spoken this discourse, the monks, hearing what the Buddha had said, were delighted and received it respectfully.