Saṃyuktāgama

61. Discourse on Analysis

Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park.

At that time the Blessed One said to the monks: “There are five aggregates of clinging. What are the five? That is, there are the bodily form aggregate of clinging … the feeling … the perception … the formations … the consciousness aggregate of clinging.

“What is the bodily form aggregate of clinging? Whatever bodily form, all of it is the four elements and the form made out of the four elements. This is called the bodily form aggregate of clinging.

“Again, that bodily form is impermanent, dukkha, and of a nature to change. If that bodily form aggregate of clinging is forever given up without a remainder, completely relinquished, ceases, fades away, is appeased, and disappears, and further instances of the bodily form aggregate of clinging are discontinued, do not arise, do not emerge—then this is reckoned sublime, this is reckoned peaceful, this is reckoned the complete abandoning of all acquisitions, the eradication of craving, dispassion, cessation, Nirvāṇa.

“What is the feeling aggregate of clinging? That is, there are six classes of feeling. What are the six? That is, there is feeling arisen from eye-contact … ear-contact … nose-contact … tongue-contact … body-contact … feeling arisen from mind-contact. This is called the feeling aggregate of clinging. Again, that feeling aggregate of clinging is impermanent, dukkha, and of a nature to change … up to … cessation, Nirvāṇa.

“What is the perception aggregate of clinging? That is, there are six classes of perception. What are the six? That is, there is perception arisen from eye-contact … up to … perception arisen from mind-contact. This is called the perception aggregate of clinging. Again, that perception aggregate of clinging is impermanent, dukkha, and of a nature to change … up to … cessation, Nirvāṇa.

“What is the formations aggregate of clinging? That is, there are six classes of intentions. What are the six? That is, there is intention arisen from eye-contact … up to … intention arisen from mind-contact. This is called the formations aggregate of clinging. Again, that formations aggregate of clinging is impermanent, dukkha, and of a nature to change … up to … cessation, Nirvāṇa.

“What is the consciousness aggregate of clinging? That is, there are six classes of consciousness. What are the six? That is, there is the class of eye-consciousness … up to … the class of mind-consciousness. This is called the consciousness aggregate of clinging. Again, that consciousness aggregate of clinging is impermanent, dukkha, and of a nature to change … up to … cessation, Nirvāṇa.

“Monks, if one gives attention with wisdom to this teaching, examines it, analyses it, and accepts it, then one is called a faith-follower, who transcends and leaves behind the round of births, who goes beyond the stage of a worldling, who will certainly attain the fruit of stream-entry and will not pass away in-between without having attained the fruit of stream-entry.

“Monks, if one gives attention with superior wisdom to this teaching, examines it, analyses it, and accepts it, then one is called a Dharma-follower, who transcends and leaves behind the round of births, who goes beyond the stage of a worldling, who will certainly attain the fruit of stream-entry and will not pass away in-between without having attained the fruit of stream-entry.

“Monks, one who sees this teaching as it really is with right wisdom will eradicate the three fetters, abandoning them with knowledge, that is, the three fetters of personality view, clinging to rules, and doubt. Monks, this is called the fruit of stream-entry; without falling into evil destinies one will certainly progress rightly to full awakening, after at most seven existences of being reborn as a deva or a human, one will then reach the complete ending of dukkha.

“Monks, if one sees this teaching as it really is with right wisdom and does not give rise to the influxes in the mind, one is called an arahant, who has eradicated the influxes, has done what had to be done, relinquished the heavy burden, gained his own benefit, eradicated all the fetters of existence, one whose mind with right understanding has attained liberation.”

When the Buddha had spoken this discourse, the monks, hearing what the Buddha had said, were delighted and received it respectfully.