Saṃyuktāgama

75. No title

Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park.

At that time the Blessed One said to the monks: “There are five aggregates of clinging. What are the five? That is, they are the bodily form aggregate of clinging … the feeling … the perception … the formations … the consciousness aggregate of clinging.

“Monks, being liberated by becoming disenchanted with bodily form and free from desire for it, by its cessation and not arising, one is called a Tathāgata, who is an arahant, fully awakened. In the same way being liberated by becoming disenchanted with feeling … perception … formations … consciousness and free from desire for it, by its cessation and not arising, one is called a Tathāgata, who is an arahant, fully awakened.

“Monks, by also becoming disenchanted with bodily form and free from desire for it, by its cessation and not arising, one is called an arahant who has been liberated by wisdom. In the same way becoming disenchanted with feeling … perception … formations … consciousness and being free from desire for it, by its cessation and not arising, once is called an arahant who has been liberated by wisdom.

“Monks what is the difference between the Tathāgata, who is an arahant, fully awakened, and an arahant who has been liberated by wisdom?”

The monks said to the Buddha: “The Tathāgata is the root of the Dharma, the eye of the Dharma, the foundation of the Dharma. May the Blessed One explain the meaning of this fully to the monks. Having heard it, the monks will uphold and receive it respectfully.”

The Buddha said to the monks: “Listen and pay careful attention to what I shall tell you. The Tathāgata, who is an arahant, fully awakened, has realized the Dharma that he had not heard before, has been able himself to realize the Dharma, to penetrate to supreme awakening. He teaches the Dharma to future generations to awaken his disciples, that is, the four establishments of mindfulness, the four right efforts, the four bases for supernormal power, the five faculties, the five powers, the seven awakening factors, and the eightfold path.

“Monks, this is called a Tathāgata, who is an arahant, fully awakened, who has attained what had not been attained, who has gained what had not been gained, who understands the path, who distinguishes the path, who teaches the path, who penetrates the path, who moreover is able to successfully teach and admonish disciples, who in this way teaches them rightly and in such a way that they joyfully delight in the good Dharma. This is called the difference between a Tathāgata and an arahant.”

When the Buddha had spoken this discourse, the monks, hearing what the Buddha had said, were delighted and received it respectfully.