Saṃyuktāgama

9. Discourse on Disenchantment

Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. At that time the Blessed One said to the monks:

“Bodily form is impermanent, what is impermanent is dukkha, what is dukkha is not-self, what is not self is not mine. One who contemplates like this is reckoned to be contemplating truly and rightly. In the same way feeling … perception … formations … consciousness is impermanent, what is impermanent is dukkha, what is dukkha is not-self, what is not self is not mine. One who contemplates like this is reckoned to be contemplating truly and rightly.

“A noble disciple who contemplates like this becomes disenchanted with bodily form, disenchanted with feeling … perception … formations … consciousness. Because of disenchantment he does not delight in consciousness, because of not delighting in consciousness he attains liberation. To one who is liberated the true knowledge arises: ‘Birth for me has been eradicated, the holy life has been established, what had to be done has been done, I myself know that there will be no receiving of further existence.’”

Then the monks, hearing what the Buddha had said, were delighted and received it respectfully.