Sutta Nipāta

Tuvaṭaka Sutta

4.14. The Quick Way

Question
I ask the Kinsman of the Sun, the great seeker,
About seclusion and the state of peace.
Seeing what is a bhikkhu quenched,
Not grasping at anything in the world?

Buddha
One should completely extract
The root of proliferation and reckoning—
The notion, “I am the thinker”.
One should train to dispel whatever craving
There is inside, ever mindful.

Whatever principle they have known for themselves,
Whether internally or externally,
They would not be stubborn about that,
For good people say that this is not quenching.

You shouldn’t, on that account, think you are better,
Or worse, or even the same;
Though affected by many different things,
You should not keep thinking of yourself.

Totally calm within himself,
A bhikkhu would not seek peace from another;
For one who is at peace with themselves,
There is nothing to hold on to, still less to put down.

As in the middle of the ocean,
There are no waves, but all is still,
So they would be still, unmoving;
A bhikkhu is not haughty at all.

Question
You have taught me, with your eyes open,
Seeing principles for yourself, dispelling dangers;
Venerable sir, tell me the practice,
The rules of conduct and also meditation.

Buddha
Not letting their eyes wander,
Turning their ear from crass conversations,
Not greedy for flavors,
And not thinking of anything in the world as “mine”.

When things afflict him,
A bhikkhu would not whinge at all;
He would neither long for rebirth,
Nor tremble at dangers.

He would not store up goods that he gets,
Whether food and drink,
Other edibles or cloth,
And he would not be afraid of not getting anything.

Practising jhāna, not footloose,
Not remorseful, nor negligent;
That bhikkhu would stay in quiet
Places for meditation and sleep.

They would not sleep much,
But be ardent, developing wakefulness;
They would abandon laziness, deceit, jokes, games,
And sex, together with other frivolities.

One of my followers would not cast spells,
Or interpret dreams,
Nor would they practice astrology,
Prognosticate animal sounds,
Practice fertility magic,
Or [earn money] as a healer.

A bhikkhu would not be anxious when criticized,
Nor puffed up when praised;
But would get rid of greed together with
Stinginess, anger, and slander.

They would not continue at a trade,
A bhikkhu would not incur blame at all;
They would not linger in a village,
Nor cajole people hoping to get stuff.

A bhikkhu would not be boastful,
Nor speak with an ulterior motive;
He would not practice impudence,
Nor say things that were argumentative.

He would not be carried away by lies,
Nor deliberately betray anyone;
Nor would he look down on anyone for their
Way of life, intelligence, virtue, or vows.

Even if provoked by different sayings,
Of ascetics or of ordinary people,
He would not answer harshly,
For good people make no enemies.

Fully understanding this principle,
An inquiring bhikkhu would always train mindfully;
Knowing quenching as peace,
He would not be negligent in Gotama’s teaching.

He overcomes, he is not overcome,
Seeing the Dhamma with his own eyes, not by hearsay;
Therefore he would always respectfully train in accord,
Diligent in the teaching of the Buddha.